To be a good carer, you need to be well trained

We take training very seriously at Christies Care. We invest upwards of £250,000 a year into training carers. We have our own in-house, award-winning training team, who take every potential carer through a two week residential induction course and through a two-day update every year after that.

Training doesn’t stop there. We have in-depth courses to train carers to be able to care for clients with specific conditions. So if a carer shows an aptitude to work for clients with dementia, they’ll go on our 2 day residential and 10 unit distance-learning dementia course.

Need help or advice from someone who knows what they are talking about? Ask the training team. Carers do all the time. So do our clients.

The trainers welcome it; having contact with real-world situations improves the training they give. The trainers are qualified to give advice on most aspects of care and know who else to recommend if they can’t help.

The most important part of training is that the carers are always taught to “put yourself in your client’s shoes.”

We train carers to ask themselves

“What would I want if I were in my client’s place?”

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Industry-leading 2 week Induction Training

Our Induction training is something that makes us stand out from the rest of the care providers in the UK. Our training team are award winning and we invest upwards of £250,000 a year in our training programme. When you have successfully passed your telephone interview we will invite you to attend our free, 2 week residential training course.

It is important to our clients that we are able to introduce well-trained carers to them, so all of our carers must go through the training and pass all of the tests. The induction training is designed to give everyone a basic understanding of care and help you feel confident in your first few jobs. Every member of office staff has also been through the training, so we know what it feels like first hand.

All carers also come back every year for a 2-day update to their training. This is just as important to keep your skills and knowledge refreshed and up to date. You will be expected to pass some more tests in order to carry on working to your full capacity. During your update we will also talk to you about how things are going, make sure everything is going well and you are happy.

Of course we don’t expect you to go all year without any contact. As well as your carer support team the training team are available if you have questions or concerns and they will happily take your call or call you back. We also run a range of condition specific training courses throughout the year, allowing you to gain deeper knowledge in some of the conditions that your clients may have.

“I’ve said before the training is excellent. I’ve trained and worked with various care agencies and Christies Care offer a far broader approach to training and support which probably isn’t fully appreciated until it’s unavailable.”

STEVEN COTTER, Christies Carer

  • Payments, National insurance, taxes, self-assessment.
  • How Christies Care operates
  • Medication including practical & theory assessments
  • Safeguarding including theory assessment
  • Health & Safety
  • End of life care
  • Safer People Moving & Handling including practical & theory assessments
  • Bed Bath & Dressing
  • Pressure sores, avoidance and care
  • Equipment/facilities for those with a disability
  • Continence Management
  • Disability Awareness
  • Fluids & Nutrition
  • Infection Prevention, Control & theory assessment
  • Food Hygiene including theory assessment
  • Dementia
  • Conflict Management, Dealing with Stress and Philosophy of Values
  • Emergency First Aid
  • Learning Disabilities & Autistic Spectrum Disorders
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Many of you will travel a long way to come and train to be a carer with Christies. You are making an investment in your future and it makes sense that you do your best to get as much out of these 2 weeks as you can.

We recently had a particularly excellent group of recruits through our induction training which has been lovely.  All groups bring something different to the table so I asked the training and recruitment teams to give some tips for those of you coming to training, or thinking of applying, how to get the best out of your 2 weeks.

BE KEEN TO LEARN

“They've been so eager to learn.”

BE KEEN TO LEARN

Come to induction open to learning as much as you can. You won’t go far wrong! The training is interesting, engaging & fun. It’s even better if you’re keen to get as much out of it as possible.

BE INQUISITIVE

“They asked loads of pertinent questions throughout, keeping us on our toes.”

BE INQUISITIVE

There’s no such thing as a stupid question. Asking questions will make you a better carer and help our trainers to improve. If you don’t understand something never be afraid to ask. It will help you get the best out of your training.

BE ENTHUSIASTIC

“We even found them, several times, sitting in the training room ready to go”

BE ENTHUSIASTIC

It’s an exciting time. You’re embarking on a new career, either learning a new skill or building on previous knowledge. If you’re enthusiastic you’ll have a great week.

BE FRIENDLY

“They have bonded amazingly well, encouraging & supporting each other.”

BE FRIENDLY

You’re all in the same boat. You’ll learn together, supporting each other through the training, tests and time away from home. A big part of your support network, you’ll see them each year at update training.

HAVE FUN

“They all have lovely natures about them with a great sense of humour”

HAVE FUN

The things you’ll be learning about are serious and important, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun whilst you are learning. In fact it’s encouraged! Laugh a lot and you’ll enjoy training and retain more information too.

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Condition-specific Training

We run a variety of condition-specific training courses throughout the year for our carers.

These are supplementary to the induction training, and some of the topics are covered in the induction course.  This means that if you find yourself particularly interested in a topic, or you go get a regular client with a specific condition you can learn more.

“The training really is excellent and this helps to build your confidence when going to clients.”

SUSAN PLUMBRIDGE, Christies Carer

The training day covers key information about “Makaton” as well as learning stages 1 & 2 of the core vocabulary signs.

You will explore different ways we communicate and how this is applied in learning disability support.

Sue Mallion, our regional “Makaton” tutor, is the facilitator for the training.

Caring for someone with dementia can be very difficult.

It is all too easy to say or do something that causes the client to become anxious and distressed. That distress can spiral out of control. This is why Christies Care invests heavily in in-depth dementia care training. With training, carers know the general principles and practices to follow. They also know how to adapt these general principles to their own clients.


Our dementia training is facilitated by Helen Drain (an approved trainer for the Alzheimer’s Society), who herself looked after her husband as he developed vascular dementia. In Helen’s words:

“I got everything wrong, made all the mistakes you can and I don’t want to see anyone else going through that.”

The training course has ten units of distance learning (where the carers learn how to adapt the general principles to their clients) and a two day residential course, here in Saxmundham.

The training works. In the words of carers who have completed the course:

“I now feel confident that I have a good wide understanding of the different conditions falling under dementia. I can put myself in the client’s shoes and walk with them instead of against them.

I have learned how to evoke memories and give something back. The course has shown me how to get so much more from my work and how something as small as a smile can have such a big meaning.”

“Six months down the line, with a heap of patience, my client is up, having meals with her husband by her side and even venturing out into the garden. She enjoys sitting having the newspaper read to her and is getting back into enjoying her paintings.”

A carer who arrived at a new Alzheimer's client’s house to find that she never left her bed or opened the bedroom curtains. The client had no interest in the world around her - she would not even open her eyes.

“The course was very good. Very useful! It made me more sensitive and opened my mind towards not just the person with a dementia condition but generally towards elderly & vulnerable people. It helped me to see them as a person, not just patients with health problems. Now I feel satisfaction when I can understand my clients and recognise their needs . I feel fulfilment when I can meet those needs.

I have a new insight into the mind of a person with a dementia condition and it helps me to be more successful with my clients. In my work I use the whole range of the exercises given.

One can have a lot of sympathy and compassion doing this work but it might not be enough to be efficient if one hasn’t the knowledge & skills to know how to approach the person. This course gave me tools and skills which I can use in my professional life and I personally feel more competent and confident working with clients now.”

The training day will teach you how to safely deliver a range of seated physical activities.

This inspiring and motivating day is suitable for most adults.

There will be practical information about Health & Safety as well as record keeping and communication.

The training day will enable you to leave with a confident and positive attitude to therapeutic activity.

This course is endorsed by the College of Occupational Therapists.

Induction training teaches the carers emergency first-aid.

Many carers want to know more about first-aid and to have more in-depth training.

The training programme has been developed specifically for Christies Care, covering all aspects of emergency first aid, with the course content customized to fit the likely scenarios a live-in carer will encounter.

This one day course consists of:

  • Primary Survey
  • Secondary Survey
  • Basic Life Support
  • Severe Bleeding
  • Causes of Unconsciousness
  • Heart Conditions

The end of somebody’s life is a very important time and it is important that the right care is given and that the care is given in a manner that suits the person who is dying.

It is equally important that carers themselves stay strong. It is vital that carers can look after themselves and can manage the emotional effects of death. A large part of this course, therefore, covers ways for carers themselves to cope with this deeply difficult time and remain able to give their best care and attention to their client.

This two day residential palliative care course is run by our in-house training team and has been developed with input from UKHCA and St. Elizabeth Hospice. It prepares all those who attend the course to support and assist the client with their daily needs towards and at the end of their life.

What does this course cover?

  • Aspects of change as someone approaches the end of life
  • Spiritual & religious needs
  • Communication & documentation
  • Collaboration with other professions
  • Looking after yourself
  • Managing death & bereavement

We know that a well-trained carer is much more likely to be a success supporting somebody with a learning disability than someone without any training. So our carers who work with people with a learning disability attend our two-day residential learning disability training course.

Since the Spring of 2015 this has become part of our two-week induction training for all new carers.

Christies Care is a British Institute of Learning Disabilities (BILD) satellite centre providing Health & Social Care Diplomas with the Learning Disabilities pathway.

Carers who attend our specialist training course also have the opportunity to undertake their Health & Social care Diploma at level 2 or 3, supported and assessed by a Christies Care assessor. Our awarding body for these qualifications is City & Guilds.

Our two day learning disability training course is facilitated by experienced trainers led by our learning disabilities coordinator. All have years of experience working in the Learning Disabilities field and pass on their enthusiasm, knowledge and experience to the carers they are training.

The team are also able to advise carers when they are supporting people with a learning disability, should the carer have any questions or concerns.

“The aim of the training I deliver is to encourage Carers to see beyond the labels and support the person to have a great life”
IAN HART, Learning Disabilities Trainer

The two day course consists of:

  • Day 1 – Introduction to LD:
    • To gain an understanding of the causes and effects of having a learning disability
    • To explore the effects of history on current attitudes and approaches to learning disability support
    • To discuss and explore person centred values in care
    • To develop an understanding of person centred thinking and planning
    • To identify and compare communication needs in relation to learning disability support.
    • To look at the purpose and use of NHS passports
    • Introducing useful resources
    • Day 2 – Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder & Challenging Behaviour
    • To gain a basic understanding of Autistic Spectrum Disorders and complexities of Supporting people with ASD
    • Introduce Positive Behavioural Support
    • Explore what is “challenging behaviour”
    • Understand why challenging behaviours might occur
    • To explore the stages of behaviour and the cues to an incident of challenging behaviour
    • To acquire knowledge and skills relating to Positive Behaviour Support
    • To know the difference between proactive and reactive strategies.
    • To know how to complete records and reports relating to incidents of challenging behaviour
    • Introducing Person Centred Thinking Tools that support recording and reflecting on Behaviours.

    Many of our clients have serious mental health problems, and this is why they need live-in care.

    Dementia is the most common disease affecting our clients’ mental health, and we provide excellent, in-depth training.

    However, we also have clients with other mental health conditions. Carers therefore want a training course to give them a grounding in mental health and disorders and critically how to respond to someone’s experience of a mental disorder.

    Christies Care has used a specialist training provider to develop a course that fits carers’ needs.

    The course lasts for one day and covers:

    • Identification of different triggers of mental disorders
    • Signs and symptoms of common and severe mental disorders such as depression, anxiety, psychosis and bipolarity
    • Appropriate response to people experiencing symptoms of mental disorders
    • The understanding that people experiencing possible mental disorders need referral to appropriate services
    • Support for people with mental disorders
    • The law relating to mental health in the UK

    Multiple Sclerosis affects many of our clients. Having an understanding of this disease helps carers who have clients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Our in-house trainers have received training from the Multiple Sclerosis society and have adapted this training to answer the questions that they hear most often from carers.

    The course covers:

    • What is multiple sclerosis?
    • Types of Multiple Sclerosis
    • Diagnosis and treatment

    Many of our clients have Parkinson’s disease and our carers, especially those who care regularly for clients with Parkinson’s, asked us to provide training to help them in their job.

    Our trainers have themselves received training from Parkinson’s UK. Our trainers have adapted Parkinson’s UK training to fit the circumstances likely to be encountered by a live-in carer.

    The course lasts for half a day and is run on the same day as the MS awareness and care course.

    The course covers:

    • The history of Parkinson’s
    • Non-motor symptoms
    • Causes & diagnosis
    • Treatments & progression
    • Mobility & exercise
    • Looking after the bowel & bladder

    Stroke and the effects of stroke, affect a large number of our clients. Our clients affected by stroke may have live-in carers as they are discharged from hospital, to care for them as they rehabilitate and re-learn their skills.

    Other clients, who may have had a more serious stroke or series of strokes, may need live-in carers full time, to enable them to lead as independent a life as possible.

    We have a one-day stroke awareness and care training course, which helps to give carers the skills they will need to care for stroke survivors. Our in-house training team has been trained by the Stroke Association. The team has then amended this training to fit the needs of live-in carers.

    This one day course covers:

    • What is a stroke?
    • Risks and causes
    • Signs and symptoms
    • Long-term effects
    • Diagnosis and treatments

    One of the most important aspects of our induction training is the Medication Administration Record (MAR) sheets. These are used to keep track of a clients medication, tracking when and what has been used and updating current stock levels.

    View a written guide.

    If no video is shown above please click here

    The training day covers key information about “Makaton” as well as learning stages 1 & 2 of the core vocabulary signs.

    You will explore different ways we communicate and how this is applied in learning disability support.

    Sue Mallion, our regional “Makaton” tutor, is the facilitator for the training.

    Caring for someone with dementia can be very difficult.

    It is all too easy to say or do something that causes the client to become anxious and distressed. That distress can spiral out of control. This is why Christies Care invests heavily in in-depth dementia care training. With training, carers know the general principles and practices to follow. They also know how to adapt these general principles to their own clients.


    Our dementia training is facilitated by Helen Drain (an approved trainer for the Alzheimer’s Society), who herself looked after her husband as he developed vascular dementia. In Helen’s words:

    “I got everything wrong, made all the mistakes you can and I don’t want to see anyone else going through that.”

    The training course has ten units of distance learning (where the carers learn how to adapt the general principles to their clients) and a two day residential course, here in Saxmundham.

    The training works. In the words of carers who have completed the course:

    “I now feel confident that I have a good wide understanding of the different conditions falling under dementia. I can put myself in the client’s shoes and walk with them instead of against them.

    I have learned how to evoke memories and give something back. The course has shown me how to get so much more from my work and how something as small as a smile can have such a big meaning.”

    “Six months down the line, with a heap of patience, my client is up, having meals with her husband by her side and even venturing out into the garden. She enjoys sitting having the newspaper read to her and is getting back into enjoying her paintings.”

    A carer who arrived at a new Alzheimer's client’s house to find that she never left her bed or opened the bedroom curtains. The client had no interest in the world around her - she would not even open her eyes.

    “The course was very good. Very useful! It made me more sensitive and opened my mind towards not just the person with a dementia condition but generally towards elderly & vulnerable people. It helped me to see them as a person, not just patients with health problems. Now I feel satisfaction when I can understand my clients and recognise their needs . I feel fulfilment when I can meet those needs.

    I have a new insight into the mind of a person with a dementia condition and it helps me to be more successful with my clients. In my work I use the whole range of the exercises given.

    One can have a lot of sympathy and compassion doing this work but it might not be enough to be efficient if one hasn’t the knowledge & skills to know how to approach the person. This course gave me tools and skills which I can use in my professional life and I personally feel more competent and confident working with clients now.”

    The training day will teach you how to safely deliver a range of seated physical activities.

    This inspiring and motivating day is suitable for most adults.

    There will be practical information about Health & Safety as well as record keeping and communication.

    The training day will enable you to leave with a confident and positive attitude to therapeutic activity.

    This course is endorsed by the College of Occupational Therapists.

    Induction training teaches the carers emergency first-aid.

    Many carers want to know more about first-aid and to have more in-depth training.

    The training programme has been developed specifically for Christies Care, covering all aspects of emergency first aid, with the course content customized to fit the likely scenarios a live-in carer will encounter.

    This one day course consists of:

    • Primary Survey
    • Secondary Survey
    • Basic Life Support
    • Severe Bleeding
    • Causes of Unconsciousness
    • Heart Conditions

    The end of somebody’s life is a very important time and it is important that the right care is given and that the care is given in a manner that suits the person who is dying.

    It is equally important that carers themselves stay strong. It is vital that carers can look after themselves and can manage the emotional effects of death. A large part of this course, therefore, covers ways for carers themselves to cope with this deeply difficult time and remain able to give their best care and attention to their client.

    This two day residential palliative care course is run by our in-house training team and has been developed with input from UKHCA and St. Elizabeth Hospice. It prepares all those who attend the course to support and assist the client with their daily needs towards and at the end of their life.

    What does this course cover?

    • Aspects of change as someone approaches the end of life
    • Spiritual & religious needs
    • Communication & documentation
    • Collaboration with other professions
    • Looking after yourself
    • Managing death & bereavement

    We know that a well-trained carer is much more likely to be a success supporting somebody with a learning disability than someone without any training. So our carers who work with people with a learning disability attend our two-day residential learning disability training course.

    Since the Spring of 2015 this has become part of our two-week induction training for all new carers.

    Christies Care is a British Institute of Learning Disabilities (BILD) satellite centre providing Health & Social Care Diplomas with the Learning Disabilities pathway.

    Carers who attend our specialist training course also have the opportunity to undertake their Health & Social care Diploma at level 2 or 3, supported and assessed by a Christies Care assessor. Our awarding body for these qualifications is City & Guilds.

    Our two day learning disability training course is facilitated by experienced trainers led by our learning disabilities coordinator. All have years of experience working in the Learning Disabilities field and pass on their enthusiasm, knowledge and experience to the carers they are training.

    The team are also able to advise carers when they are supporting people with a learning disability, should the carer have any questions or concerns.

    “The aim of the training I deliver is to encourage Carers to see beyond the labels and support the person to have a great life”
    IAN HART, Learning Disabilities Trainer

    The two day course consists of:

    • Day 1 – Introduction to LD:
      • To gain an understanding of the causes and effects of having a learning disability
      • To explore the effects of history on current attitudes and approaches to learning disability support
      • To discuss and explore person centred values in care
      • To develop an understanding of person centred thinking and planning
      • To identify and compare communication needs in relation to learning disability support.
      • To look at the purpose and use of NHS passports
      • Introducing useful resources
      • Day 2 – Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorder & Challenging Behaviour
      • To gain a basic understanding of Autistic Spectrum Disorders and complexities of Supporting people with ASD
      • Introduce Positive Behavioural Support
      • Explore what is “challenging behaviour”
      • Understand why challenging behaviours might occur
      • To explore the stages of behaviour and the cues to an incident of challenging behaviour
      • To acquire knowledge and skills relating to Positive Behaviour Support
      • To know the difference between proactive and reactive strategies.
      • To know how to complete records and reports relating to incidents of challenging behaviour
      • Introducing Person Centred Thinking Tools that support recording and reflecting on Behaviours.

      Many of our clients have serious mental health problems, and this is why they need live-in care.

      Dementia is the most common disease affecting our clients’ mental health, and we provide excellent, in-depth training.

      However, we also have clients with other mental health conditions. Carers therefore want a training course to give them a grounding in mental health and disorders and critically how to respond to someone’s experience of a mental disorder.

      Christies Care has used a specialist training provider to develop a course that fits carers’ needs.

      The course lasts for one day and covers:

      • Identification of different triggers of mental disorders
      • Signs and symptoms of common and severe mental disorders such as depression, anxiety, psychosis and bipolarity
      • Appropriate response to people experiencing symptoms of mental disorders
      • The understanding that people experiencing possible mental disorders need referral to appropriate services
      • Support for people with mental disorders
      • The law relating to mental health in the UK

      Multiple Sclerosis affects many of our clients. Having an understanding of this disease helps carers who have clients with Multiple Sclerosis.

      Our in-house trainers have received training from the Multiple Sclerosis society and have adapted this training to answer the questions that they hear most often from carers.

      The course covers:

      • What is multiple sclerosis?
      • Types of Multiple Sclerosis
      • Diagnosis and treatment

      Many of our clients have Parkinson’s disease and our carers, especially those who care regularly for clients with Parkinson’s, asked us to provide training to help them in their job.

      Our trainers have themselves received training from Parkinson’s UK. Our trainers have adapted Parkinson’s UK training to fit the circumstances likely to be encountered by a live-in carer.

      The course lasts for half a day and is run on the same day as the MS awareness and care course.

      The course covers:

      • The history of Parkinson’s
      • Non-motor symptoms
      • Causes & diagnosis
      • Treatments & progression
      • Mobility & exercise
      • Looking after the bowel & bladder

      Stroke and the effects of stroke, affect a large number of our clients. Our clients affected by stroke may have live-in carers as they are discharged from hospital, to care for them as they rehabilitate and re-learn their skills.

      Other clients, who may have had a more serious stroke or series of strokes, may need live-in carers full time, to enable them to lead as independent a life as possible.

      We have a one-day stroke awareness and care training course, which helps to give carers the skills they will need to care for stroke survivors. Our in-house training team has been trained by the Stroke Association. The team has then amended this training to fit the needs of live-in carers.

      This one day course covers:

      • What is a stroke?
      • Risks and causes
      • Signs and symptoms
      • Long-term effects
      • Diagnosis and treatments
      One of the most important aspects of our induction training is the Medication Administration Record (MAR) sheets. These are used to keep track of a client’s medication, tracking when and what has been used and updating current stock levels.

      View a written guide.

      If no video is shown above please click here

      APPLY NOW

      Your Training Team

      ALISON HAWKINS
      ALISON HAWKINSTraining Team Leader

      “I have worked for Christies Care since February 1997. My trained career is as a hairdresser and I still keep my hand in with family haircuts, I also worked as a care assistant, which I thoroughly enjoyed, especially with those clients who suffered from a form of Dementia.

      I seem to have worked in most departments for Christies Care – Administration, Recruitment and finally my position in the Training Department. The company was quite small when I first started and it has been a wonderful journey seeing the company grow to its current position.

      I love to spend time with my family – I have two grown up boys and three beautiful granddaughters and, weather permitting, my partner and I spend a lot of time sailing on the river Alde.”

      HELEN DRAIN
      HELEN DRAINDeputy Training Team Leader

      “Ten years ago I walked into Rose House not knowing what to expect, here I am today thoroughly enjoying my ‘working’ days, I like the diversity of the work, the ever evolving changes, and being part of a great training team.

      Time away from the office is usually filled with my two bands, as a drummer and manager, I sometimes manage to fit in seeing the family, consisting of fourteen grandchildren (but not all at once).”

      SARAH HOSTLER
      SARAH HOSTLERTraining Co-ordinator

      “I have been with Christies Care for 3 years now, starting in Carer Support for 2 years before moving over to the Training department. The parts I most enjoy about my role here are getting to meet different people and developing my knowledge. This enables me to provide the best guidance to the carers that we train.

      I have experience being a carer. My first caring role was in a care home for people aged 50 and above, all of whom had learning disabilities. It was very daunting at first but with support and training I found it very rewarding. I then moved into domiciliary care as a pop-in carer which was as rewarding yet totally different – being a lone carer for the majority of the time, meeting new people, in new places with a variety of different conditions, some of whom had families closely involved others that didn’t.

      I enjoy spending my spare time with my family, walking our dog and horse riding.”

      COLLEEN BARBER
      COLLEEN BARBERTraining Co-ordinator

      “Hi I’m Colleen. I moved to the UK from South Africa to work as a live-in care assistant for Christies Care. I have been a staff-member at Christies Care for 3 and a half years.

      Last year I even persuaded my sister to follow in my footsteps and becoming a live-in carer with Christies! I have always loved learning new information and meeting new people and in my current job role I get to do both.”

      KERRY BAYFORD
      KERRY BAYFORDTraining Co-ordinator / Administrator

      “Hi my name is Kerry. I’ve been a member of the Christies Care training team since December 2013. Previous to this, I was a carer for 8 years.
      I really do enjoy being part of such a great team – everyone is warm and friendly.

      As a member of the training team I get to meet our wonderful carers and, although we run the same training courses from week to week, each session is completely different.

      Outside of work I’m a mum (without a doubt one of the best things in the world) and I also have 3 dogs at home which keep me very busy.”

      IAN HART
      IAN HARTL.D. & Health and Social Care Diploma Training Co-ordinator

      “I began with Christies Care in the summer of 2013, supporting the Learning Disability training and working as a Local Area Advisor. In 2015 my role developed to encompass all aspects related to Learning Disability training and supporting carers who wish to undertake a Health and Social Care Diploma to find an appropriate provider.
      Christies are a very supportive organisation, providing a positive environment to work in, which enables office and care staff to develop.

      I have worked in the world of Learning Disabilities for over 20 years starting as a volunteer, supporting groups, working with adults with complex support needs, and managing a large Social Services day centre.
      Before joining Christies, I developed as a trainer and consultant, working with groups and organisations across the country. My personal highlights have been contributing to various Government and organisational papers such as: “Getting a Life”; “Progress for Providers” ; the Department of Health’s “Personalisation through Person-centred Planning” and “A Practical Guide to Delivering Personalisation”.

      Most of my spare time is taken up with football, either coaching or watching, in partnership with my football-crazy wife.”

      LOUISA WELTON
      LOUISA WELTONTraining Co-ordinator
      LIZZIE RICHARDSON
      LIZZIE RICHARDSONCare Certificate Co-ordinator

      “I started working for Christies Care in December 2009 as a booking co-ordinator with the Emerald Team. After being here for 6 months I took on a role within the Quality and Safeguarding team. It was a very interesting department to work in.

      When I returned from Maternity leave in May 2016 I took on a new role within the Training department as the Care Certificate co-ordinator. I love being part of such a great team and getting to work with carers on a more positive note.

      Previous to working at Christies, I worked for a pop in care agency as a booking co-ordinator and carer, sometimes seeing up to 20 different clients a day.

      Outside of work I have two little boys to run around after (2 & 4 year old) so I’m always kept very busy. I love Glamping!”

      TANYA HOWARD
      TANYA HOWARDTraining Team Administrator

      “I have been working for Christies Care for almost 11 years, having joined in May 2005. Over the years my role has been varied but very enjoyable. My work has involved me working very closely with our carers during their training and because I consider myself to be a people person I enjoy this part of my role very much.

      I have met many people from different countries and have learnt a lot about their cultures and how things in their country differ from here in the UK . Last year I joined the Training team as their Administrator and am enjoying being part of a very busy and professional team.

      In my spare time I enjoy cooking and spending time with my 2 children and 4 grandchildren.”

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